The success of two pig heart transplants for two brain-dead people

The success of two pig heart transplants for two brain-dead people
The success of two pig heart transplants for two brain-dead people


New York University surgeons have successfully transferred genetically modified pig hearts to two brain-dead people, a move that brings humanity closer to a long-term goal of transplanting pig organs to humans to solve the problem of human organ deficiency, researchers said.

The surgeons said in a press conference that the two hearts functioned normally without evidence of rejection during the three-day trials in June and July.

The experiments came after the death of a 57-year-old man from a heart condition in March, after he underwent a landmark operation two months earlier at the University of Maryland as the first person to transplant a genetically modified pig heart. The reasons for this heart failure in the end are still unclear.

The researchers said New York University purchased the two pig hearts that were modified by Revivor and tested for viruses using an enhanced monitoring protocol. The hearts showed no evidence of a swine virus called cytomegalovirus in pigs that was discovered in the Maryland man's blood and may have contributed to his death.

Four genetic modifications were made to the pigs to prevent rejection of the hearts and abnormal growth of the two organs, and six were made to help overcome incompatibilities between pigs and humans.

Researchers at New York University had also transplanted pig kidneys to two brain-dead people in 2021.

Researchers currently believe that foreign organ transplantation is safer in brain-dead patients than in living patients and is more beneficial because samples can be taken and tests performed more .


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